Archive for March, 2008

Sony PFR-V1

March 27th, 2008

Sony PFR-V1Trusted Reviews says, “It’s not too often that I’m genuinely surprised by a product, but that’s exactly what happened when I placed the PFR-V1s on my head. Perhaps unfairly, I hadn’t expected these headphones to sound anywhere near as good as they do, and even now I’m not quite sure how Sony has managed to create a sound as clear, full and completely immersive as this.
The unconventional design also makes for the most comfortable headphones I have ever worn – even after hours of listening I could hardly tell that the PFR-V1s were on my head. And despite the drivers being positioned a fair way from your ears, the majority of ambient noise disappears without the need for active noise cancelling or ear canal seals.
There’s no denying that the Sony PFR-V1s don’t come cheap, but that shouldn’t put off the target buyer. In fact, I’ll be buying a pair of these headphones as soon as I get paid, making the PFR-V1s a true Editor’s Choice.”

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TS01 Fennesz – Jeck – Matthews: Amoroso

March 23rd, 2008

TS01Am`o`ro´so
n. 1. A lover; a man enamored.
adv. 1. (Mus.) In a soft, tender, amatory style.

Charles Matthews plays the Grand Organ in York Minster, during Spire Live on 20th January 2007. This release is a homage to Arvo P?§rt…

Arvo P?§rt is often identified with the school of minimalism and more specifically, that of “mystic minimalism” or “sacred minimalism”. He is considered a pioneer of this style, along with contemporaries Henryk G??recki and John Tavener.

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Olympus LS-10

March 9th, 2008

Olympus LS-10“Overall, the recorder sounds pretty good to me. I’d say the internal mics are near-broadcast quality, although they pick up a bit more room tone than I’d like. But when using a dynamic or condenser plug-in mic there’s not much noticable hiss. I’d say the LS-10 sounds almost as good as the Sony PCM-D50, although it’s a bit difficult to make comparisons without using the two side by side under the exact same conditions.

Philip reports that the only real down sides to this recorder are the lack of XLR inputs, phantom power, or a track mark button. The PCM-D50 has most of the same limitations, but costs $50 to $100 more. The D50, however, has a track mark button, twice the internal memory (4GB compared with the LS-10’s 2GB) and an exceptional limiter function.”

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Korg MR-1

March 9th, 2008

Korg MR-1The hand-held MR-1 provides high quality 1-bit/2.8 MHz recording and playback in a shirt-pocket portable package that is perfect for location recording, broadcast journalism, podcasting, live music performances – even for rehearsals and song-writing sessions.

The MR-1 supports multiple recording formats including DSDIFF, DSF, and WSD 1-bit formats*, as well as multi-bit PCM format (BWF) with resolutions up to 24-bit/192 kHz.

It features a 20Gbyte internal hard drive, offering up to six hours of recording** at the highest audio quality (1-bit 2.8224 MHz stereo), or approximately thirty hours at CD quality (16-bit 44.1 kHz).

High-speed USB 2.0 connectivity provides for fast and easy transfer of files between the recorder and your computer. The MR-1 runs on AC or long-life rechargeable lithium polymer battery.

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Sony PCM-D50

March 9th, 2008

PCM-D50The PCM-D50 is a 96 kHz/24-bit recorder fitted with two-position (X-Y or Wide) stereo microphones, 4 GB of internal flash memory and a Memory Stick Pro-HG Duo‚Ñ¢ slot (for additional storage). The body of the D50 is constructed of lightweight metal (aluminum) and it’s built rugged to withstand the demands of pro applications, plus it offers long battery life using conventional AA alkaline batteries. The recorder includes a USB high-speed port for simple uploading/downloading its native .WAV format files to/from Windows¬Æ PC or Macintosh¬Æ computers. Other unique PCM-D50 features include digital pitch control, dual digital limiter (inherited from the PCM-D1), low-cut filter, Super Bit Mapping¬Æ, A-B repeat and MP3 playback capability. To complement the D50 recorder, new optional accessories include a remote commander, tripod stand, and microphone windscreen. Additionally, the D50 offers compadible mounting and use with the recently introduced XLR-1 wide-bandwidth balanced XLR microphone adapter.

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Marantz PMD620

March 9th, 2008

Marantz PMD620

The Marantz PMD620 is a high performance handheld digital recorder that records to SD flashcard media in either PCM (.WAV) or MP3 audio formats. Its lightweight compact form (just 62x102x25mm), ergonomic design and ease of operation commends the PMD620 to a wide range of users, including journalists, reporters, programme makers, podcasters, musicians and sound recordists everywhere.

Features include an inbuilt stereo condenser microphone array for ‚Äòpoint and shoot recording‚Äô, and an intuitive control surface for ‘one-hand’ operation, with thumb operated transport wheel and tactile, red illuminating, record button. A high contrast, low power draw organic LED (OLED) screen provides vivid display of menus which guide the user through the optimum set up and operation for their application.

Recording settings are selectable between those for high quality music recording to extended voice recording. The use of SD cards includes support for SDHC (SD High Capacity) cards, with recording file size limited only by card capacity. Recording time with a 4 GB card extends from 3 hrs 44 mins for stereo PCM (.WAV) at 24-bit / 48 kHz, to 283 hrs 44 mins – almost 12 days – for mono MP3 at 32 kbps.

Journalists and podcasters will appreciate the PMD620’s basic but useful onboard editing, with non-destructive cut-and-paste ‘Copy Segment’ editing to create new sound files. Transcription is simple with the Skip Back function, and file transfers to any computer are drag-and-drop via the USB 2.0 connectivity.

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